How to read food labels
1 year ago

 Speed-Read-a-Food-Label
Being healthy is something so many of us strive to achieve but it’s not as easy as we’d like to think; 
especially when it comes to choosing food. Virtually every food packaging has a label stating its 
calorie, fat, sugar, protein and salt content. However what does it all mean? And do we really need 
to pay attention to what it says if we want to be healthy? 
Some supermarkets have latched onto people’s confusion over food labelling and use a traffic light 
system on their labels. For example, a meal with 10.5g fat saturate is coloured red and labelled 
high, 1.5g of salt is coloured orange and labelled medium and 7.5g sugar is coloured green and 
labelled low.  
However, how do we know what is low or high if the packaging doesn’t have a traffic light coded 
system? Well there are guidelines in place which tell you if a food is high in fat, saturated fat, salt 
or sugar and if not. 
Total fat content per 100g 
High: 17.5g or more 
Low: 3g or less 
Saturated fat content per 100g 
High: 5g or more 
Low: 1.5g or less 
Sugar content per 100g 
High: 22.5g or more 
Low: 5g or less 
Salt content per 100g 
High: 1.5g or more 
Low: 0.3g or less 
For a full list of nutritional values of the foods there is often a panel or grid on the back or side of 
packaging which gives an in depth list including values per serving and total.  
When it comes to being healthy it is important to remain balanced. You don’t need to always opt for 
meals which have fully green labels on all the time as you need a bit of everything in your diet. 
That being said it is important to try to stay away from foods with high levels of salt, fat and sugar. 
nutritionlabel